Organizational Development Consultant

Fifteen Techniques for Implementing Decisions: #6 Goal Plan Go

November 24, 2014

“I read that there is a higher likelihood that goals will be obtained if the work to achieve those goals is started immediately. I have a goal-setting meeting coming up with a large group of people. After we set goals, I would like to start some of the implementation planning as soon as possible. Is there a technique that will help me do this?”

#6: Goal Plan Go

What is Goal Plan Go?

Goal Plan Go is a technique that invites your meeting participants to take responsibility for transforming the group’s goals into action. The process allows individuals to choose which planning team they would like to join, and to have the first meeting of that planning team immediately.

Because enthusiasm and momentum are at their peak at the time when goals are defined and approved, the likelihood for effective implementation increases dramatically when the action planning can begin immediately. Goal Plan Go allows this process to take place.

When to Use Goal Plan Go

  • When no specific skills or experience are required to achieve the selected goal/s and it is not required for leaders to handpick team participants.
  • When it is difficult for the participants to regularly meet together.
  • When your group has a history of good intentions but poor follow through.

How to Use Goal Plan Go

  1. Be sure that your meeting group has agreed upon a list of goals. Write a list of these goals on a few pieces of chart paper with plenty of space between each of the goals. Display them around the room.

NOTE: If possible, use existing charts from previous exercises.

  1. Ask your participants to help create planning teams for each goal. You might say, for example, “We are going to take some time in today’s meeting to plan how to turn our goals into action. To do so, we will create planning teams, one for each of our goals. Each planning team will be made up of a group of volunteers. Take a few minutes to think about which specific goal you would like to work on. Then write your name in the space under that goal. If you want or need to participate on the planning team for more than one goal, you can do so, but you will need to choose which one you will focus on today. Write your name under each goal you are interested in, but place an asterisk behind your name under all but the goal of primary interest. This will indicate that you are interested in being a part of that planning team, but will not be attending today’s planning meeting.” Exhibit a chart similar to the one below to support your instructions.

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  1. Designate a part of the room for each planning team to meet.
  2. Give the groups guidelines for their discussions and ask them to begin their planning processes. Refer to the chart below for an example of these guidelines.

Screenshot_11_25_14__9_12_AM

  1. After an appropriate period of time (depending on the amount of time available in your meeting), ask each group to report the results of their progress. Have them include any agreed upon next steps or actions as well.
  2. Determine as a group how and when to monitor the progress of the implementation efforts.

In Summary:

Goal Plan Go is a technique that invites your meeting participants to take responsibility for transforming the group’s goals into action. The process allows individuals to chose which planning teams they would like to join, and to have the first meeting of that planning team immediately.

  1. Be sure that your meeting group has agreed upon a list of goals. Write a list of these goals on chart paper with plenty of space between each of the goals.
  2. Ask your participants to think about which specific goals they would like or need to work on as part of the planning team that will transform these goals into action.
  3. Designate a part of the room for each planning group to meet.
  4. Give the groups guidelines for their discussions and have them begin their meetings.
  5. Ask each group to report back the progress of their planning efforts.
  6. Determine how and when to monitor the progress of implementation.

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NOTE:

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You will find my book Mission Critical Meetings: 81 Practical Facilitation Techniques on Amazon. Your feedback and reviews are most welcome.

http://www.amazon.com/Mission-Critical-Meetings-Facilitation-Techniques/dp/1627870377/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1408719109&sr=1-2&keywords=Mission+Critical+Meetings

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